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 Festival Of Nag Panchami

Nag-Panchami, or the festival of snakes, is celebrated on the fifth day of the moonlit-fortnight in the month of Shravan - July /August

Photo Courtesy : WHO/P. Virot

From time immemorial, snakes have held a special place in our culture. It is believed that worshipping snakes helps gain knowledge, wealth and fame, and they are revered as symbols of the yogic power of Lord Shiva. But today, these animals have become victims of our idolization and are being exploited – the reverence has now transformed into cruelty.

Snake charmers throng the streets of India with cobras and other snakes ensconced in cane baskets, asking for money. Devotees offer milk to the snakes and gather around to see the snake dance – a ritual in which snakes spread their hoods and sway to the tune of a pungi, a wind instrument.

It is believed that feeding milk to the snakes brings good fortune to the devotee, but these snakes suffer terribly and usually meet with an early death.

 

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CELEBRATIONS IN MAHARASHTRA 

In Maharashtra, Hindu women take an early bath wear their "nav-vari" - nine yards-sarees, put on ornaments and get ready for the "puja" of Nag-Devata. Snake charmers are seen sitting by the roadsides or moving about from one place to another with their baskets that hold dangerous snakes that are their pets. While playing the lingering melodious notes on their flutes, they beckon devotees with their calls -"Nagoba-la dudh de Mayi" (give milk to the Cobra Oh Mother!) On hearing that call, women come out of their houses and then the snake-charmers take out of the snakes from their baskets. Women sprinkle haldi-kumkum and flowers on the heads of the snakes and offer sweetened milk to the snakes and pray. Cash and old clothes are also given to the snake-charmers. Bowls of milk are also placed at the places which are likely haunts of the snakes.

Nag Panchami is celebrated throughout India; however, more festivities are seen in the south than in the north.

The village of Baltis Shirale, which is situated approximately 400 kilometers (approximately 250 miles) from Mumbai, conducts the most outstanding of all the celebrations.

Reportedly, the largest collection of snakes in the world can be found in Baltis Shirale. Visitors from all over the world gather in the village to worship live snakes. Interestingly, despite no venom being removed from the snakes, no one has ever been bitten.

There people pray to live cobras that they catch on the eve of this pre-harvest festival. About a week before this festival, dig out live snakes from holes and keep them in covered earthen pots and these snakes are fed with rats and milk. Their poison-containing fangs are not removed because the people of this village believe that to hurt the snakes is sacrilegious. Yet it is amazing that these venomous cobras do not bite instead protect their prospective worshipers.

On the day of the actual festival the people accompanied by youngsters, dancing to the tune of musical band carry the pots on their heads in a long procession to the sacred-temple of goddess Amba and after the ritual worship the snakes are taken out from the pots and set free in the temple courtyard. Then every cobra is made to raise its head by swinging a white-painted bowl, filled with pebbles in front. The Pandit sprinkles haldi-kumkum and flowers on their raised heads. After the puja they are offered plenty of milk and honey.

After all the obeisance is rendered to the goddess and the ritual puja is over, the snakes are put back in the pots and carried in bullock-carts in procession through the 32 hamlets of Shirala village where women eagerly await outside their houses for "darshan" of the sacred cobras. One or two cobras are let loose in front of each house where men and women offer prayers, sprinkle puffed rice, flowers and coins over them, burn camphor and agarbattis and perform "aarti" . Girls of marriageable age regard the cobras as blessings of good luck in marriage. Some courageous girls even put their faces near the cobra's dangerous fangs. Behold the wonder the cobras do not bite them!

Other popular areas of worship during the Nag Panchami include:

  • Adiesha Temple in Andhra Pradesh
  • Nagaraja Temple in Kerala
  • Nagathamman Temple in Chennai
  • Hardevja Temple in Jaipur.

CELEBRATIONS IN BENGAL

In Bengal and parts of Assam and Orissa the blessings of Mansa, the queen of serpents are sought by offering her all the religious adoration. Protection from the harmful influence of snakes is sought through the worship of Mansa who rules supreme over the entire clan of serpents. On this occasion snake-charmers are also requisitioned to invoke the Snake Queen by playing lilting and melodious tunes on their flutes.

CELEBRATIONS IN PUNJAB

In Punjab Nag-Panchami is known by the name of "Guga-Navami". A huge snake is shaped from dough, which is kneaded from the contribution of flour and butter from every household. The dough-snake is then placed on a winnowing basket and taken round the village in a colourful procession in which women and children sing and dance and onlookers shower flowers. When the procession reaches the main square of the village all the religious rites are performed to invoke the blessings of the snake god and then the dough snake is ceremoniously buried.

Important Aspects of Nag Panchami

This so called "snake day" has several important components. In addition to offerings made to the snakes throughout the country during worship and celebration, men and women celebrate the day in these ways:

  • Cobras are bathed in milk and offered rice as this is thought to offer immunity from their bites.
  • Women often partake in early baths of milk and wear colorful saris.
  • Pots of milk and flowers are placed next to holes that are believed to contain snakes as an offering of devotion. If a snake actually drinks the milk it is thought to be the ultimate sign of good luck.
  • Mansa, the Queen of Snakes, is worshiped in most parts of Bengal during Nag Panchami.
  • In the Punjabi region, a large dough snake is created and then paraded around the village. The parade is colorful with plenty of singing and dancing; at the end of the parade the snake is buried. Nag Panchami is referred to as "Guga-Navami" in Punjab.
  • Snake charmers sit alongside the roads of Maharashtra and encourage women to offer milk, flowers and haldi-kumkum (a powdered offering of tumeric and vermillion) to the dangerous snakes the snake charmers carry.
  • In many villages, snake charmers carry pots containing cobras to a central temple where they are released and then worshiped with offerings of milk and rice.
  • Mainly in the south of India, people worship figures of snakes made of clay or sandalwood as alternatives to the real-life versions.
  • No Hindu home may fry anything on the day of Nag Panchami.
  • Girls who are hoping to marry believe that the cobra offers good luck in their quest for eternal happiness.

 

 

 

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